To write, or not to write – that is the question.

write what you love

Whatever you write about, be it fiction, fact or fantasy, it has to be what you would like to read yourself, otherwise what’s the point?

I’ve always wanted to write speculative fiction and loved it, but when I was younger, I was advised to write about “real” things. Being inexperienced, I thought the people who told me this must be right and set off down a writing path to disaster.

I was constantly unhappy with the short stories, articles and would-be-novels I created and became mired in a swamp of cliched and uninspired writing. After a period of struggling, during which I even contemplated giving up the idea of becoming an author altogether, I decided enough was enough and returned to my beloved fantasy fiction.

Of course, it took me awhile to decide which sub-genre suited me best and by a long, circuitous route finally found that urban fantasy was my forte.

So, all of you out there wandering in the writing wilderness, listen to advice by all means. However, if you know in your heart of hearts some of that advice is not for you, then don’t be afraid to discard it.

elizabeth

http://www.wattpad.com/user/KatrinaJack

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http://askdavid.com/reviews/book/urban-fantasy/4787

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6 Responses to “To write, or not to write – that is the question.”

  1. Great advice, Kate. Although my reading tastes have ever been broad there are only a few genres that really ignite my passion. In the same way with writing, although you may dabble in a few areas there’ll be one or two that you thrive within. Having said that, sometimes it’s hard to define exactly what genre some things we write sits within!!

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  2. What you say reminds me of something that happened to my youngest the other week at school. She had written a story that involved slipping in and out of a dream, and part of the dream becoming reality. She came home very crestfallen to say that the teacher had scored through the first part of her story with the dreaded red pen because ‘those kind of things don’t happen in dreams’! If you’ve got literature teachers with such rigid ideas about what can and can’t go on in the subconscious/imagination, it’s not surprising the creative streak gets beaten out of most kids before they even start writing!

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    • You’re so right, Jane. Speculative fiction is just that – it’s about speculating what would happen if you could do such and such. If I met that teacher, I’d kick ’em in the shins. Lucky your daughter’s got you for a mum.

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  3. Sounds like a very bright child. 😀

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